Thanks for the researched response, Lance.

It’s very rare with iOS. An app might look odd on a new device, but it’s rare that it doesn’t function (with the exception you pointed out, but even there it’s rare that a developer did not update for 64-bit integers). The first apps I wrote were on the iPhone 4s and they still run on an iPhone XS.

OS updates are different: bugs in an OS affect web-based apps as much as they do native apps.

Joel Spolsky wrote in 2004 that web based apps would not replace their desktop alternatives. He was clearly wrong. Yet we still see people preferring to use desktop email and slack clients, native book readers, native messaging apps, native rss readers, etc.

I suspect the future is a hybrid model, part web-based, part native js/cross platform, part full native. What pains me is that web and some cross-platform apps are based on an inherently flawed language: JavaScript. Try as hard you want, but the language itself was never meant to build large-scale projects efficiently. You can wrap it in Typescript, structure it with React, have unit tests and run-time optimizers, but we’ve yet to escape the language itself. If we could get Swift to run in a browser, then we’d have something to celebrate 🍻

Engineering Team Lead, former eCommerce director. Happy to help you solve your tech problems: https://mentorly.co/mentors?m=dimitryzhttp://webit.ca

Engineering Team Lead, former eCommerce director. Happy to help you solve your tech problems: https://mentorly.co/mentors?m=dimitryz — http://webit.ca